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Masks become compulsory in England

A shopper wearing a face mask in Selfridges on Oxford Street, London, as face coverings become mandatory in shops and supermarkets in England. Photo by Victoria Jones/PA

Shoppers in England were ordered to wear face coverings for the first time on Friday as new rules came into force, albeit with the UK Government relying on customers' common sense to stick to the policy rather than active policing.

The requirement, announced on July 13, marks the latest step in Britain's slow acceptance of the benefits of face coverings in preventing the spread of COVID-19.

"I don't like them, but if it keeps people safe you’ve got to do it," said retiree Michael James, wearing a black face covering.

"I can't understand how I didn't have to wear one yesterday and I have to today. What's the difference in the two days? But, yeah, if it cuts it down, anything.”

Some retailers, including supermarkets and coffee shop chains, said they supported the rules and would ask customers to abide by them, but it would not be up to staff to enforce them.

"I've been into the supermarket this morning. There were some people wearing masks and some people not wearing masks. I was," said former teacher Helen Curran.

Britons were initially told there was no compelling evidence masks helped to stop spread the virus, but that position has gradually been reversed, first with a requirement to wear them on pub-lic transport, and now in shops.
The move comes as deaths and new cases drop and the government encourages people back to work.

Asked how the rules should work, Prime Minister Boris Johnson said: "We should rely on the massive common sense of the British people... The people understand the value of face masks in confined spaces."

Police can fine shoppers £100 if they refuse to wear a mask, but the Police Federation of England and Wales, which represents rank and file officers, said enforcement should be a last resort.

John Apter, the national chairman of the Police Federation of England and Wales, said forces “do not have the resources” to widely enforce the law that came into force on Friday.

He said: “It is our members who are expected to police what is a new way of living and I would urge retail outlets to play their part in making the rules crystal clear – if you are not wearing a face covering then you are not coming in.

“Officers will be there to help stores if needed – but only as a last resort, as we simply do not have the resources.

“The vast majority of the public have complied with the lockdown rules so far and I would hope they will continue to do the right thing and wear face coverings in stores to help protect fellow citizens to minimise the spread of the virus.”

Guidance was finally issued by the Government on Thursday after weeks of confusion and mixed messaging from ministers.

It states that staff in premises where face coverings are required are encouraged to “take reasonable steps to promote compliance with the law” and can refuse entry to people who do not have a valid exemption under the rules.

Retail and trade organisations criticised the Government for taking so long to publish the new laws and guidance, having announced the measure more than a week ago.

And union leaders voiced fears the rules could put workers’ safety at risk if there are abusive customers or people who refuse to wear a mask.

Tom Ironside, director of business and regulation at the British Retail Consortium trade association, said the role of retailers is to “remind and encourage compliance”.

“Where the rules aren’t being followed enforcement will be a matter for police,” he said.

“We expect and hope this will only apply in a small minority of cases.

“What’s very clear is enforcement is not a matter for retailers, that has to be a matter for the police because otherwise you will be asking staff in stores to do things which can add to the potential for conflict.”

Costa Coffee said it would “not be challenging customers” who are not wearing a mask “since they may have a legitimate reason as to why they are unable to wear one”.

Sainsbury’s said that while it is asking everyone to continue “playing their part” in helping to keep everyone safe in store by following the rules, “our colleagues will not be responsible for enforcing them”.

Asda said it will “strongly encourage customers to wear a face covering” but added: “It is the responsibility of the relevant authorities to police and enforce the new rules.”

Tesco will be selling face coverings at the entrance and Waitrose said staff would be at the en-trance to stores reminding customers of the requirement.

McDonald’s said takeaway customers will need to wear face coverings but those who eat in the restaurant will not unless they are moving around the premises, for example to use toilets or when at self-order screens.

Venues like restaurants, pubs, gyms, hairdressers, beauty salons, leisure centres, cinemas, concert halls and theatres are exempt from the new rules.

Other exemptions to face coverings include children under 11, people with breathing problems and anyone who cannot put on, wear or remove a face covering because of a physical or mental illness or impairment or disability.

The guidance states that people should “assume” it is standard to wear a face covering when visiting a hospital, GP, care home or other primary or community healthcare setting.

The British Medical Association said while the guidance is helpful, it has come late in the day.

Dr Chaand Nagpaul, the association’s council chairman, said the measures were “long overdue” and added “the uncertainty of recent weeks has done nothing to inspire public confidence”.

He warned the virus “does not discriminate between buildings” and said there must be “an absolute assurance” that other mitigating measures are in place at those sites, such as screens and physical distancing.

Last week police chiefs were blindsided by the Government’s announcement after they were not told in advance of the plans and some police chiefs warned there are not the resources to patrol the aisles.

Metropolitan Police Commissioner Dame Cressida Dick said she hoped shoppers who refuse to wear masks would be “shamed” into compliance.

The Government said the responsibility for wearing a face covering “sits with individuals”, adding: “Businesses are encouraged to take reasonable steps to encourage customers to follow the law, including through signs and providing other information in store.”

The Prime Minister’s official spokesman told reporters on Thursday: “With shops, we would expect them to give advice to customers and remind them that they should be wearing a face covering and I’m sure the overwhelming majority of the public will do so.”

The laws could be in place until at least January, and even last a year, unless the Government decides to scrap them in the meantime.

Face coverings are already mandatory in shops in Scotland and will be compulsory in shops in Northern Ireland from August 1. There are no plans to make them compulsory in shops in Wales.

What do the UK’s new laws on face masks say?

By Flora Thompson, PA Home Affairs Correspondent
People will need to wear a face covering in shopping centres, banks, takeaway outlets, sandwich shops and supermarkets under new regulations that came into force in England on Friday.

The UK Government is bringing new laws into force which could see people who flout the rules get slapped with a fine.

What has changed?
New laws called The Health Protection (Coronavirus, Wearing of Face Coverings in a Relevant Place) (England) Regulations 2020 have been published and will be brought into force on Friday.

What does the law say?
No-one can go enter certain buildings like shops without a face covering – which covers your face and nose – unless they have a reasonable excuse.

Face coverings must be worn in: shops and shopping centres; banks; building societies; credit unions; short-term loan providers; savings clubs and currency exchange offices; anywhere that transmits money by cash or cheque; post offices.

A reasonable excuse includes: where a person cannot put on, wear or remove a face covering because of physical or mental illness, impairment or disability; when accompanying someone who relies on lip reading; to avoid or escape harm or injury to themselves or others; in order to eat and drink or take medication.

Are there any exemptions?
Yes.
The rules do not apply to children under the age of 11, employees working in the business in question or public transport staff, police officers, other emergency workers and officials.

Premises which are exempt include: restaurants with table service and bars, including those in hotels or members’ clubs; pubs; libraries; law firms; medical and dental practices; vets; cinemas; theatres; museums and galleries; aquariums, indoor zoos or visitor farms, or other indoor tourist, heritage or cultural sites; nightclubs; bingo halls; concert halls, public halls; conference centres; indoor fitness studios; gyms; leisure centres; indoor swimming pools; water parks; bowling alleys; funfairs; theme parks; amusement arcades; indoor soft play areas; indoor sports arenas; casinos; hotels; spas; beauty salons and hairdressers; tattoo and piercing parlours; storage centres; funeral directors; photography studios and auction houses.

What happens if I break the rules?
You can be told to put on a face covering or leave the premises by police or transport officers.

Police officers can escort someone from a building for refusing to follow the rules and can use reasonable force if necessary.

You could be fined £100, reduced to £50 if paid within 14 days, or even prosecuted.

How long will the rules be in force?
The rules must be reviewed by the UK Government within six months of the law being brought into force, which is January 24 2021.

Ultimately the law expires after a year unless the UK Government scraps it beforehand.

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