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Young people feel more lonely than older generations, UK study suggests

PICTURE POSED BY MODEL File photo of a woman showing signs of depression. Young people feel more lonely than those in later life, often revealing they feel they have no-one to turn to, according to a new report by the Young Women's Trust. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Wednesday January 2, 2019. A survey of more than 4,000 people aged 18 to 30, and 1,100 aged between 54 and 72 suggested that one in four of the younger age group feel isolated. See PA story INDUSTRY Lonely. Photo credit should read: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire

By Alan Jones, Press Association Industrial Correspondent

Young people feel more lonely than those in later life, often revealing they feel they have no-one to turn to, according to a new report.

A survey of more than 4,000 people aged 18 to 30, and 1,100 aged between 54 and 72 suggested that one in four of the younger age group feel isolated.

This compared to one in 10 people aged 64 to 72, said the Young Women's Trust.

The charity said its research indicated that young women felt most lonely.

The Trust's chief executive Dr Carole Easton said: "We cannot ignore the epidemic of loneliness among young people, and especially young women, in the UK.

"Feeling isolated can have a bad impact on young women's confidence and their mental health.

"Combined with a lack of networks, this can make it harder to look for jobs and can lead to young women being shut out of the labour market.

"As well as investment in community and mental health services, more support is needed for young women who want to work.

"This could include mentoring to help ease women's move back into education or employment. Tackling loneliness would benefit individuals, businesses and the economy."