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The Nautilus Project in ‘Voices from the Ocean’ podcast

Marine biologist and co-founder of The Nautilus Project, Lewis Stagnetto, has taken part in a new podcast series called 'Voices from the Ocean' in collaboration with Mission Blue and alongside Sylvia A. Earle.

Mission Blue is a non-profit organisation that inspires action to explore and protect the ocean and Ms Earle is its founder, an oceanographer and a National Geographic Explorer-In-Residence.

'Voices from the Ocean' features scientists embodying different species of ocean wildlife, found at Hope Spots throughout the world, answering questions directly as the species.

Mr Stagnetto discussed phytoplankton from the Alboran Sea Hope Spot.

The series is made in collaboration with audio producer, Annabel Ross, creator of 'Messages from the Wild', which looks at new ways of giving nature a voice.

“These brief ‘conversations’ are intended to be educational as well as entertaining and amusing,” Mr Stagnetto said.

“They are aimed at both adults and children as a way of giving them a new perspective on wildlife in the hope that they will feel more knowledgeable and therefore more respectful towards wildlife in general.”

“There is something about listening to these recordings with the animals as “first person” that grabs the attention of the listeners and somehow they also retain the information more easily.”

The recordings are unscripted and Mr Stagnetto described how phytoplankton only live for a few days.

Each one of them can reproduce up to a couple of a thousand times depending on the time year. Spring is the most fertile time due to water circulation and light.

As autotrophs makes their own food via photosynthesis and needs carbon dioxide, water, light and chlorophyll makes sugars they needs to feed themselves.

Mr Stagnetto said phytoplankton together with billions of others are responsible for the atmosphere humans enjoy today as they take carbon dioxide and produce around half of the oxygen humans breath every year.

Phytoplankton much more important than all of the rainforests combined, Mr Stagnetto explained, and stressed this is why looking after the oceans and looking after phytoplankton at the base of the food chain is so important going forward.

Without them there would be no dolphins, bluefin tuna or whales for example.

Should Marine biologist and co-founder of The Nautilus Project, Lewis Stagnetto, has taken part in a new podcast series called 'Voices from the Ocean' in collaboration with Mission Blue and alongside Sylvia A. Earle.

Mission Blue is a non-profit organisation that inspires action to explore and protect the ocean and Ms Earle is its founder, an oceanographer and a National Geographic Explorer-In-Residence.

'Voices from the Ocean' features scientists embodying different species of ocean wildlife, found at Hope Spots throughout the world, answering questions directly as the species.

Mr Stagnetto discussed phytoplankton from the Alboran Sea Hope Spot.

The series is made in collaboration with audio producer, Annabel Ross, creator of 'Messages from the Wild', which looks at new ways of giving nature a voice.

“These brief ‘conversations’ are intended to be educational as well as entertaining and amusing,” Mr Stagnetto said.

“They are aimed at both adults and children as a way of giving them a new perspective on wildlife in the hope that they will feel more knowledgeable and therefore more respectful towards wildlife in general.”

“There is something about listening to these recordings with the animals as “first person” that grabs the attention of the listeners and somehow they also retain the information more easily.”

The recordings are unscripted and Mr Stagnetto described how phytoplankton only live for a few days.

Each one of them can reproduce up to a couple of a thousand times depending on the time year. Spring is the most fertile time due to water circulation and light.

As autotrophs makes their own food via photosynthesis and needs carbon dioxide, water, light and chlorophyll makes sugars they needs to feed themselves.

Mr Stagnetto said phytoplankton together with billions of others are responsible for the atmosphere humans enjoy today as they take carbon dioxide and produce around half of the oxygen humans breath every year.

Phytoplankton much more important than all of the rainforests combined, Mr Stagnetto explained, and stressed this is why looking after the oceans and looking after phytoplankton at the base of the food chain is so important going forward.

Without them there would be no dolphins, bluefin tuna or whales for example.

Should phytoplankton disappear the world would be an inhospitable place because they remove the carbon dioxide.

Mr Stagnetto said phytoplankton would say: “Humans need to remember that however clever you are you ultimately form part of the ecosystem that us phytoplankton have driven since the beginning of life on earth and you need to remember you rely on that ecosystem for your own lives and you need to look after that ecosystem.”

Listen online: https://soundcloud.com/mission-blue-1/phytoplankton-lewis-stagnetto-voices-from-the-ocean

disappear the world would be an inhospitable place because they remove the carbon dioxide.

Mr Stagnetto said phytoplankton would say: “Humans need to remember that however clever you are you ultimately form part of the ecosystem that us phytoplankton have driven since the beginning of life on earth and you need to remember you rely on that ecosystem for your own lives and you need to look after that ecosystem.”

Listen online: https://soundcloud.com/mission-blue-1/phytoplankton-lewis-stagnetto-voices-from-the-ocean

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